Scottish Rite California
Dalcho Resignation Letter
Last Known Communication on Freemasonry By Dr. Fredrick Dalcho By: Ill. Bro. McDonald "Don" Burbidge, 33º      Out of the "Eleven Gentlemen of Charleston" Ill. Bro. Frederick Dalcho was the most documented.      Some of the reasons for this were because he was a surgeon, doctor, newspaper editor, Lieutenant of Artillery, established the "The Charleston Gospel Messenger and Protestant Episcopal Register" and other various publications, along with the various duties he performed at St. Philip’s and St. Michael’s Church.      Through out his entire life Ill. Bro. Frederick Dalcho became or assumed the role of "Secretary" in the various organizations he was affiliated with. In this role has left an enormous amount of information that anyone can read and learn from.      In 1823, Ill. Brother Dalcho became involved in an unpleasant controversy with some of his Masonic associates. As a result of this "controversy", Ill. Brother Dalcho resigned his office of Grand Chaplin of the Grand Lodge, and Grand Commander of the Supreme Council.      Out of all the writings he has created or the talks he has given throughout his life only one stands out among them all.      Sadly enough it is his resignation letter to the "Grand Lodge" of the Masons that I am referring to.      As you read his "Resignation Letter" you will realize that he is talking from his heart and the pain he felt in writing this letter. The letter was written in 1823. "Respectable and Dear Brethren:      "As indisposition in my family will prevent me from attending in my place in the Grand Lodge this evening, I respectfully enclose to you the subject-matter of your deliberations.      "Every friend of the Masonic institution, as well as every member, of our Order, must have felt, not only deeply interested, but greatly grieved, at the unhappy difference which, for a few weeks, has existed in the Grand Lodge. As an old Mason, and particularly as a religious man, I confess that it produced in my mind the most painful sensations. Believing, as I conscientiously do, that genuine Free-Masonry is a powerful auxiliary to the religion I profess, I cannot but be solicitous to see it practiced in its native purity and truth. That charity which covereth a multitude of sins; and that Brotherly-love, which makes the friend of his species, are fundamental principles of both. And where these principles are permitted to govern our feelings and our conduct, weather in the domestic and social circle, in the Lodges of the Fraternity, or the community in which we live, there peace and happiness, the types of celestial enjoyment, must necessarily reign.      "Every religious man feels that he holds an important station in the sphere in which Divine Providence has been pleased to cast his lot. He feels himself connected with the world of spirits, as well as with this; and he judge’s of everything, which passes here, by its probable effect upon our future state of existence. He knows that freemasons are under stronger sanctions than other men are; and, therefore, that more is required of freemasons than of others. His heart tells him that man lives not for himself alone; that he is surrounded by human beings, whom, perhaps, his opinions and example may, in some wise, injure or improve. He feels an accountability resting upon him, which controls his passions and regulates his conduct. He considers himself as a light to the world, to guide the wayfaring man through the journey of life; and to lead him to the temple, ‘not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.’ And does not the Freemason, my Brethren, stand on an eminence equally as elevated? Is he not, too; or, I should rather say, ought he not to be, ‘a burning and shining light’ to all who walk in darkness, to those who have no rallying point for the moral principle, and no sanctions to constrain their conduct? Doubtless, my Brethren, they are. Then ought they not to show, in their lives and actions, the happy influence of Masonic principles over worldly feelings and personal considerations, and be an example for the imitation of others? Unquestionably, my Brethren, they ought. And, to the honor of the Craft be it recorded, that they are many, and, I trust, very many, who are strictly governed by the principles they profess, and who are bright examples to the ignorant and profane. What will come before you, this evening, will confirm this interesting and important truth.      "Intrusted with the ‘ministry of reconciliation,’ by Divine authority, I interposed between our Brethren, who, unhappily, were at variance, and as a mutual friend, endeavored to heal the wounds which misrepresentation and misunderstanding had made. And it gives me real pleasure to state to the Grand Lodge, that from the candid and very Honourable and brotherly manner in which my mediation assurance that the genuine principles of our ancient and Honourable Order had neither lost their influence over the human heart, nor fled to other climes. I found in all with whom I had occasion to converse on the subject, a sincere disposition to restore harmony to the Grand Lodge, and to pour the blam of Masonic affection into the troubled bosom. I cannot express to you, my dear Brethren, the delight it afforded me to be, under God, the happy instrument of producing this reconciliation. I know, however, that you will see, with me, the important effects it must necessarily produce on the respectability, of our Order, and, with me, will rejoice in the success of my mediation.      "I now, my Brethren, submit to you the evidence of this happy reconciliation, and respectfully suggest, that, after it shall have been read, the following resolution may be proposed for the unanimous consent of the Grand Lodge:      "Resolved That the agreement entered into between the M.W. Grand Master and Past Grand Master on one part, and Brothers McCosh, Sebring and Holbrook on the other part, be considered as highly satisfactory to this Grand Lodge; and that the ‘declarations and recommendations’ of said Grand Officers, as set forth in the 2d articles, be now adopted in the conformity with their wishes.      "Most sincerely offering up my prayer for your individual prosperity and happiness, and the harmony and increased respectability and usefulness of your Most Worshipful Grand Lodge,      "I have the honour to be, very respectfully, your sincere and affectionate Brother, FREDERICK DALCHO, Grand Chaplin."
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Copyrighted © 2017, Orient of California, all rights reserved  

Scottish Rite California
Dalcho Resignation Letter
Last Known Communication on Freemasonry By Dr. Fredrick Dalcho By: Ill. Bro. McDonald "Don" Burbidge, 33º      Out of the "Eleven Gentlemen of Charleston" Ill. Bro. Frederick Dalcho was the most documented.      Some of the reasons for this were because he was a surgeon, doctor, newspaper editor, Lieutenant of Artillery, established the "The Charleston Gospel Messenger and Protestant Episcopal Register" and other various publications, along with the various duties he performed at St. Philip’s and St. Michael’s Church.      Through out his entire life Ill. Bro. Frederick Dalcho became or assumed the role of "Secretary" in the various organizations he was affiliated with. In this role has left an enormous amount of information that anyone can read and learn from.      In 1823, Ill. Brother Dalcho became involved in an unpleasant controversy with some of his Masonic associates. As a result of this "controversy", Ill. Brother Dalcho resigned his office of Grand Chaplin of the Grand Lodge, and Grand Commander of the Supreme Council.      Out of all the writings he has created or the talks he has given throughout his life only one stands out among them all.      Sadly enough it is his resignation letter to the "Grand Lodge" of the Masons that I am referring to.      As you read his "Resignation Letter" you will realize that he is talking from his heart and the pain he felt in writing this letter. The letter was written in 1823. "Respectable and Dear Brethren:      "As indisposition in my family will prevent me from attending in my place in the Grand Lodge this evening, I respectfully enclose to you the subject-matter of your deliberations.      "Every friend of the Masonic institution, as well as every member, of our Order, must have felt, not only deeply interested, but greatly grieved, at the unhappy difference which, for a few weeks, has existed in the Grand Lodge. As an old Mason, and particularly as a religious man, I confess that it produced in my mind the most painful sensations. Believing, as I conscientiously do, that genuine Free-Masonry is a powerful auxiliary to the religion I profess, I cannot but be solicitous to see it practiced in its native purity and truth. That charity which covereth a multitude of sins; and that Brotherly-love, which makes the friend of his species, are fundamental principles of both. And where these principles are permitted to govern our feelings and our conduct, weather in the domestic and social circle, in the Lodges of the Fraternity, or the community in which we live, there peace and happiness, the types of celestial enjoyment, must necessarily reign.      "Every religious man feels that he holds an important station in the sphere in which Divine Providence has been pleased to cast his lot. He feels himself connected with the world of spirits, as well as with this; and he judge’s of everything, which passes here, by its probable effect upon our future state of existence. He knows that freemasons are under stronger sanctions than other men are; and, therefore, that more is required of freemasons than of others. His heart tells him that man lives not for himself alone; that he is surrounded by human beings, whom, perhaps, his opinions and example may, in some wise, injure or improve. He feels an accountability resting upon him, which controls his passions and regulates his conduct. He considers himself as a light to the world, to guide the wayfaring man through the journey of life; and to lead him to the temple, ‘not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.’ And does not the Freemason, my Brethren, stand on an eminence equally as elevated? Is he not, too; or, I should rather say, ought he not to be, ‘a burning and shining light’ to all who walk in darkness, to those who have no rallying point for the moral principle, and no sanctions to constrain their conduct? Doubtless, my Brethren, they are. Then ought they not to show, in their lives and actions, the happy influence of Masonic principles over worldly feelings and personal considerations, and be an example for the imitation of others? Unquestionably, my Brethren, they ought. And, to the honor of the Craft be it recorded, that they are many, and, I trust, very many, who are strictly governed by the principles they profess, and who are bright examples to the ignorant and profane. What will come before you, this evening, will confirm this interesting and important truth.      "Intrusted with the ‘ministry of reconciliation,’ by Divine authority, I interposed between our Brethren, who, unhappily, were at variance, and as a mutual friend, endeavored to heal the wounds which misrepresentation and misunderstanding had made. And it gives me real pleasure to state to the Grand Lodge, that from the candid and very Honourable and brotherly manner in which my mediation assurance that the genuine principles of our ancient and Honourable Order had neither lost their influence over the human heart, nor fled to other climes. I found in all with whom I had occasion to converse on the subject, a sincere disposition to restore harmony to the Grand Lodge, and to pour the blam of Masonic affection into the troubled bosom. I cannot express to you, my dear Brethren, the delight it afforded me to be, under God, the happy instrument of producing this reconciliation. I know, however, that you will see, with me, the important effects it must necessarily produce on the respectability, of our Order, and, with me, will rejoice in the success of my mediation.      "I now, my Brethren, submit to you the evidence of this happy reconciliation, and respectfully suggest, that, after it shall have been read, the following resolution may be proposed for the unanimous consent of the Grand Lodge:      "Resolved That the agreement entered into between the M.W. Grand Master and Past Grand Master on one part, and Brothers McCosh, Sebring and Holbrook on the other part, be considered as highly satisfactory to this Grand Lodge; and that the ‘declarations and recommendations’ of said Grand Officers, as set forth in the 2d articles, be now adopted in the conformity with their wishes.      "Most sincerely offering up my prayer for your individual prosperity and happiness, and the harmony and increased respectability and usefulness of your Most Worshipful Grand Lodge,      "I have the honour to be, very respectfully, your sincere and affectionate Brother, FREDERICK DALCHO, Grand Chaplin."
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